ABOUT US

Based in Blenheim, Wildlife Management International Limited (WMIL) is an ecological consultancy dedicated to research and conservation of nature. For over 30 years, our team has been working in monitoring, protecting, and managing natural ecosystems both in New Zealand and overseas. Our organised and motivated team is highly trained and can bring specialised skills to your project, no matter how big or small.

We have a strong ornithological back ground, with our team being some of the country’s leading birders. Ensuring that this is more than just a job, we have a real passion for nature, it’s conservation and research.

Clients include central and regional Government conservation and research agencies, non-government conservation organisations and private sector commercial businesses. Many projects involve working with local organisations in a partnership approach, which we see as critical to achieving long term conservation gains.

Here at WMIL we are committed to local action, that’s why a portion of every invoice is donated to New Zealand’s most isolated community conservation group, the Chatham Islands Taiko Trust, to support grass roots conservation.

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    BRAIDED RIVER

    Focused work in these complex ecosystems aimed at providing solutions to protect several endangered birds that rely on these habitats.
  • rat icon

    INVASIVE SPECIES ERADICATION AND CONTROL

    With over 30 years of experience in the eradication of pests from islands, our team has the skills to assess, design and implement your eradication programme.
  • bird icon

    BIRD RESEARCH AND CONSERVATION MANAGEMENT

    With a strong ornithological background our team have the skills, experience and training to implement research and conservation projects on any species in any habitat.
  • seabird icon

    SEABIRD RESEARCH AND TRANSLOCATION

    Working on a wide range of species from gulls to shags and petrels to albatross, our team have developed into leading authorities on several seabird species.
  • river icon

    CHATHAM ISLANDS CONSERVATION

    With 12 bird species currently listed as endangered, Chatham Islands birds need help, our team works with local community conservation group, the Chatham Islands Taiko Trust, to save these endemic species.
  • community icon

    COMMUNITY DRIVEN CONSERVATION

    With a real belief and commitment to community driven conservation many of our projects are in partnership with local organisations or communities.
  • monitoring icon

    ECOLOGICAL SURVEYS, MONITORING AND RESTORATION

    Our long background and intimate knowledge of the environmental and conservation arena has given us the expertise required to provide these skills to your project
  • environment icon

    INTRODUCED PREDATOR CONTROL

    Introduced pest control is vital to saving endangered bird species and our team has vast experience in the pest control arena.
  • frog icon

    ENDEMIC FROG RESEARCH

    Our team have vast experience with native frog research, monitoring, and management.
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Wildlife Management International

Recent updates

Wildlife Management International added 2 new photos.

The field season has officially started with the first black-fronted tern nest found on the Clarence River last week. The WMIL team will be monitoring the breeding success of the endemic species over the next couple of months on the Acheron and upper Clarence Rivers in Canterbury.
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Wildlife Management International added 3 new photos.

Since 2009, WMIL and Birds New Zealand Marlborough have been leading a study to investigate the movements and survival of Black-billed Gulls breeding in Marlborough. On the Wairau River alone we have successfully banded 2,111 Black-billed Gull chicks, each with a metal and an easy to read white darvic leg band. From our banding and re-sighting efforts we have been able to gain a greater understanding of their dispersal behaviour and wintering quarters. As shown in the maps, most of Wairau’s Black-billed Gulls are seen wintering in Marlborough, with some wintering in Kaikoura and as far as the North Island. Re-sightings at colonies have also recorded Wairau River chicks breeding on the Takaka, Motueka, Buller, Maruia, Awatere, Clarence, Waiau and Hurunui Rivers. Please continue to keep an eye out for banded Black-billed Gulls, and send your sightings into us, as every sighting is important.
First map - “Wintering grounds where Wairau’s Black-billed Gulls have been re-sighted”
Second map - “Colonies other than the Wairau River where Wairau’s Black-billed Gulls have been sighted breeding”
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Wildlife Management International shared Vote Banded Dotterel's post.

WMIL is proud to be supporting banded dotterel for the 2018 Bird of the Year. Visit www.birdoftheyear.org.nz to cast your vote before the 15th of October.

Here's a message from George Hobson, a talented young birder from Wellington and campaign manager for the vote banded dotterel campaign:

Did you know Banded Dotterels are as endangered as two species of Kiwi?! It’s crazy to me that the kiwi gets so much attention, love, support and money, while the Banded Dotterel gets practically none!

The Pohowera are in serious trouble. Currently their population is estimated at between 20,000 and 50,000, which I know, sounds like quite a few… However, in reality, that number is dropping drastically. What’s really scary is we don’t actually know how drastically, because there isn’t enough work being done on them to be sure – so their population could actually be much smaller than we think. Some of the big problems for Pohowera are introduced predators like Stoats and Hedgehogs, habitat loss and people just not knowing about them. Things like hedgehogs get an easy meal out of a Pohowera nest, and a careless 4x4 can really easily drive over a nest without realising it.

So please, give your vote to an underbird this Bird Of The Year. Give your vote to the Banded Dotterel. Help raise awareness, and save another bird from facing extinction.
-George Hobson (Campaign Manager)
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Voting for #BirdOfTheYear is officially OPEN!! You can now go to www.birdoftheyear.org.nz and #VoteBandie - go do it! They're by far the cutest birds in the comp, so spread the word and tell all your friends to #VoteBandie Did you know Banded Dotterels are as endangered as two species of Kiwi?! It’s crazy to me that the kiwi gets so much attention, love, support and money, while the Banded Dotterel gets practically none! The Pohowera are in serious trouble. Currently their population is estimated at between 20,000 and 50,000, which I know, sounds like quite a few… However, in reality, that number is dropping drastically. What’s really scary is we don’t actually know how drastically, because there isn’t enough work being done on them to be sure – so their population could actually be much smaller than we think. Some of the big problems for Pohowera are introduced predators like Stoats and Hedgehogs, habitat loss and people just not knowing about them. Things like hedgehogs get an easy meal out of a Pohowera nest, and a careless 4x4 can really easily drive over a nest without realising it. So please, give your vote to an underbird this Bird Of The Year. Give your vote to the Banded Dotterel. Help raise awareness, and save another bird from facing extinction. -George Hobson (Campaign Manager)

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Wildlife Management International added 6 new photos.

Nikki has recently got back from a weekend in the Seaward Kaikoura mountains, assisting with a census of Hutton’s shearwaters being carried out by the Department of Conservation and Hutton’s Shearwater Charitable Trust. This work involves catching Hutton’s shearwaters at night as they return to their colonies in the snow-clad Kaikoura mountains, and marking them with non-toxic paint, to enable them to be re-sighted at sea over the coming days. Over two nights the team managed to catch and ‘paint’ over 2000 shearwaters, and survey teams are now out on the water off the Kaikoura Coast to attempt to re-sight the birds at sea. As an interesting postscript to this story, the day after Nikki got back from this trip, he spotted a large flock of Hutton’s shearwaters from his living room window at his home at Rarangi Beach, and after scanning through the flock with his spotting scope managed to find one of the painted birds that had been caught by hand in the Seaward Kaikoura mountains only days earlier!
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Wildlife Management International added 5 new photos.

Over the last couple of months the WMIL team have been out mist netting, capturing passerines to study and band. We have been examining and banding a variety of species such as finches, dunnocks, fantails, house sparrows, silvereyes, blackbirds, song thrushes and recently a welcome swallow. Having a closer look at these species allows us to determine their age, sex, measurements and their moult.
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