ABOUT US

Based in Blenheim, Wildlife Management International Limited (WMIL) is an ecological consultancy dedicated to research and conservation of nature. For over 30 years, our team has been working in monitoring, protecting, and managing natural ecosystems both in New Zealand and overseas. Our organised and motivated team is highly trained and can bring specialised skills to your project, no matter how big or small.

We have a strong ornithological back ground, with our team being some of the country’s leading birders. Ensuring that this is more than just a job, we have a real passion for nature, it’s conservation and research.

Clients include central and regional Government conservation and research agencies, non-government conservation organisations and private sector commercial businesses. Many projects involve working with local organisations in a partnership approach, which we see as critical to achieving long term conservation gains.

Here at WMIL we are committed to local action, that’s why a portion of every invoice is donated to New Zealand’s most isolated community conservation group, the Chatham Islands Taiko Trust, to support grass roots conservation.

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    BRAIDED RIVER

    Focused work in these complex ecosystems aimed at providing solutions to protect several endangered birds that rely on these habitats.
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    INVASIVE SPECIES ERADICATION AND CONTROL

    With over 30 years of experience in the eradication of pests from islands, our team has the skills to assess, design and implement your eradication programme.
  • bird icon

    BIRD RESEARCH AND CONSERVATION MANAGEMENT

    With a strong ornithological background our team have the skills, experience and training to implement research and conservation projects on any species in any habitat.
  • seabird icon

    SEABIRD RESEARCH AND TRANSLOCATION

    Working on a wide range of species from gulls to shags and petrels to albatross, our team have developed into leading authorities on several seabird species.
  • river icon

    CHATHAM ISLANDS CONSERVATION

    With 12 bird species currently listed as endangered, Chatham Islands birds need help, our team works with local community conservation group, the Chatham Islands Taiko Trust, to save these endemic species.
  • community icon

    COMMUNITY DRIVEN CONSERVATION

    With a real belief and commitment to community driven conservation many of our projects are in partnership with local organisations or communities.
  • monitoring icon

    ECOLOGICAL SURVEYS, MONITORING AND RESTORATION

    Our long background and intimate knowledge of the environmental and conservation arena has given us the expertise required to provide these skills to your project
  • environment icon

    INTRODUCED PREDATOR CONTROL

    Introduced pest control is vital to saving endangered bird species and our team has vast experience in the pest control arena.
  • frog icon

    ENDEMIC FROG RESEARCH

    Our team have vast experience with native frog research, monitoring, and management.
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Wildlife Management International

Recent updates

Wildlife Management International shared New Zealand Bird Atlas's post.

Thanks Novo for the great work on this, we are deep into the planning for this project ready for lanuch at the BirdsNZ Conference in Wellington on June 1st. Please check in regulalry over the coming months for updates and how you can get in behind this awesome project!
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Last week we launched our website holding page, www.birdatlas.co.nz providing a brief introduction to our exciting project. Over the coming months we will be developing our full site, in the meantime download the eBird app on your smart phone and keep up to date here and via Instagram. With the first step of the project underway, we would like to take this opportunity to thank our partners and sponsors, Birds New Zealand, Goodness Kitchen & Wildlife Management International, without them this important conservation project wouldn't be possible.

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Wildlife Management International added 7 new photos.

Danielle and Kailash have been monitoring the breeding the success of Black-fronted terns and Black-billed gulls on the Hurunui and Waiau Rivers since October and have now completed their final checks for the season. This is the second year of a five year habitat enhancement/pest management project initiated by the Hurunui Waiau Water Zone Committee. Works are being undertaken in collaboration with Environment Canterbury (ECan) and the Department of Conservation (DOC). Breeding success has been slightly better than the first season however it has still been very poor largely due to several significant flooding events as well as predation.
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Wildlife Management International added 2 new photos.

In our longest running seabird research project, WMIL presently have a large team up on Aotea/Great Barrier Island working on takoketai/black petrel. With the birds in the middle of their incubation period the team is trying to complete a vast number of tasks. This includes identifying all the parents dutifully siting on eggs as part of a 25 year long demographic study tracking adult survival and longevity. Recovering GLS devices deployed last May to provide data on the migration during the non-breeding season – so far we have 40 of 50 devices back. Undertaking dozens of transects through the dense forest to work out a population estimate in the key breeding range. And attaching tiny GPS trackers to adults to determine the foraging range of breeding birds during incubation. So an exceptionally busy field trip, with some important research objectives. The photos here are provided by Gareth Parry, who was lucky enough to bump into the team on Hirakimata/Mt Hobson attaching a GPS device to a breeding takoketai and send them in to our Office.
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Wildlife Management International added 2 new photos.

"WMIL is helping Chatham Island farmers Bruce and Liz Tuanui and the Chatham Island Taiko Trust carry out a transfer of Sooty Shearwaters from the outlying islands in the Chatham group back on to main Chatham Island. The transfer aims to re-establish a breeding population of Sooty shearwater on main Chatham that has long disappeared due to habitat destruction and predation. 100 chicks per year will be transferred to the new colony site within a predator proof fenced coastal reserve on the Tuanui's farm. First off though we need to get the 100 burrows built and buried in the ground! Here's Dave from WMIL busy at work in the Taiko Trust workshop in the Chathams building the boxes, and the stack he has managed to get through so far with a bit of help from some keen volunteers."
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At present we have a team on Lady Alice Island working with Flesh-footed Shearwater. Part of our work programme is trying to complete over 300 transects to undertake a population estimate for the island, the first one in almost ten years, during one of these the team made a great discovery – a Buller’s Shearwater on an egg. Only known to breed on the Poor Knights, this is the first breeding record for the species from another location in over 20 years (there is one other record from Simmonds Island in the far North). The team will be trying to asses if this bird is one of a lone pair, or if a small colony is starting to establish on the island. ... See moreSee less

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